Race and Inclusion

Racial Justice and Inclusiveness Committee

The Friends of Roslindale Branch Library have formed a Racial Justice and Inclusiveness Committee to plan educational events, discussions, and presentations related to race, ethnicity, religion, and culture.  We also created a special list of books related to these topics.

If you are interested in joining our committee, email info@friendsofroslindalelibrary.org.

Schedule of Events

All of our upcoming Saturday afternoon book discussions will have an emphasis on how race and inclusion fit into issues related to the 2020 presidential election.

1619 Project Discussion (FULL)
Saturdays, February 1 & 22, 2 - 4 PM
JP Branch Library, 30 South St

We are no longer accepting new attendees for this discussion, as we have met the seating capacity.  Due to overwhelming interest, we will host a second 1619 Project discussion in February only for new people who aren't attending the current discussion that ends next Saturday.  The February discussions will not be a continuation of January's discussions.  Thanks to the 50-plus people who have come out for our discussions each week this month (and even more people on the waiting list)!  We are thrilled that so many people are interested in this important conversation, and we want to accommodate as many new people as possible in future discussions.

Readings for February 1 (19 pages):

  • Nikole Hannah Jones—"The Idea of America.”  Consider this article through the lens of black and white American political identity and experience.
  • Matthew Desmond—"Capitalism.”  Consider this article through the lens of black and white American economic identity and experience.
  • Kevin M. Kruse—“Traffic.”  Consider this article through the lens of black and white American social identity and experience
  • Bryan Stevenson—“Mass Incarceration.”  Consider this article through the lens of black and white American social identity and experience
  • “Wealth Gap”-- Trymaine Lee

The 1619 Project is a groundbreaking series of essays, poems, short fiction, and a photo essay featured in the August 18, 2019 edition of The New York Times Magazine.It looks at the legacy of slavery and race in America since the first enslaved Africans were brought to Jamestown, Virginia. The discussion will be facilitated by local educator Josh Frank and a free online copy of the magazine's edition can found on the Friends' website.

The discussion is co-sponsored by the Friends of JP Branch Library.

Beloved Book Discussion
Saturdays, March 7, 14 & 28, 2- 4 PM
JP Branch Library, 30 South Street

We will discuss Toni Morrison's acclaimed novel about the horrors of American slavery through the eyes of its protagonist Sethe, who was born a slave and escaped to Ohio, but eighteen years later she is still not free. The discussion will be led by local educator Josh Frank and copies of the book can be borrowed from JP Branch Library. Please register for the discussion by calling JP library at (617) 524-2053 or in-person at their library's adult reference desk, so they will know how many people to expect for attendance. The discussion is co-sponsored by the Friends of JP Branch Library.

How To Be An Antiracist Discussion
Saturdays, May 16 and 30, 2 - 5 PM
JP Branch Library, 30 South Street

We will discuss Ibram X. Kendi's book about understanding and uprooting racism and inequality in our society—and in ourselves. The discussion will be led by local educator Josh Frank and copies of the book can be borrowed from JP Branch Library. Please register for the discussion by calling JP library at (617) 524-2053 or in-person at their library's adult reference desk, so they will know how many people to expect for attendance. The discussion is co-sponsored by the Friends of JP Branch Library.